Carrick Acquires Rights to CT900, Plans New Trial in Ovarian Cancer Patients

Carrick Acquires Rights to CT900, Plans New Trial in Ovarian Cancer Patients
Carrick Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company, has acquired the rights to CT900 and plans to conduct a later-stage clinical trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the investigational therapy in women with resistant or refractory ovarian cancer. The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and global health company BTG, the original developers of the therapy candidate, have reached an agreement with Carrick to move CT900 to next-stage clinical trials. Under the new deal, Carrick now has exclusive worldwide rights to develop and commercialize CT900 and is already planning a trial for it. “We’re very pleased to be partnering with Carrick to bring CT900 into the larger trials that are needed to confirm that it’s an effective drug for the treatment of some high-grade ovarian cancers,” Toby Richardson, ICR’s deputy director of enterprise, said in a press release. CT900, created by a team from the Cancer Research UK Cancer Therapeutics Unit at ICR and formerly known as BTG945, is the first of a new class of small molecule therapies. It mimics folic acid — or vitamin B9 — to selectively enter ovarian cancer cells, and kills them by blocking an enzyme called thymidylate synthase, which causes irreparable DNA damage. CT900 specifically targets ovarian cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells alone, because they have an
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