First Patient Dosed in Phase 1 Trial of MCY-M11 in Ovarian Cancer, Peritoneal Mesothelioma

First Patient Dosed in Phase 1 Trial of MCY-M11 in Ovarian Cancer, Peritoneal Mesothelioma
MaxCyte has begun dosing participants in a Phase 1 trial to assess its lead CAR T-cell therapy, MCY-M11, for the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer and peritoneal mesothelioma patients who failed prior chemotherapy. Taking place at the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health and Washington University in St. Louis, the open-label study (NCT03608618) is expected to include 15 participants. It is still recruiting patients.  "The initiation of patient dosing in our first clinical trial with our lead CAR therapeutic candidate is a significant milestone for MaxCyte, validating our streamlined manufacturing process for clinical use," Doug Doerfler, MaxCyte's CEO, said in a press release. "We are extremely pleased to have very experienced investigators at two leading clinical centers conducting this study in solid tumors." CAR T-cell immunotherapy — an approach that consists of collecting a patient’s own T-cells and modifying them in the lab to recognize cancer cells when injected back into the patient — has been successful in treating some leukemias and lymphomas. Current CAR T-cell approaches, however, require a great deal of time to be expanded in the lab and are often associated with marked toxicity, caused by an overactive immune system. This has limited their development. Aiming to address these issues, MaxCyte has been developing a kind of transient CAR T-cell approach. The company uses their proprietary CARMA platform, which allows the modification of immune cells with a messenger RNA molecule instead of using the standard virus-based approaches. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are molecules that translate DNA into proteins, but are not inserted in the cell's genome. In this way, once the mRNA molecule is degraded, CAR
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