Fertility-sparing Surgery Can Effectively Treat Borderline Ovarian Tumors, Study Shows

Fertility-sparing Surgery Can Effectively Treat Borderline Ovarian Tumors, Study Shows
Fertility-sparing surgery can effectively treat borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs), while preserving a woman's ability to conceive and bear children, a new study suggests. The study, "Reproductive and obstetrical outcomes with the overall survival of fertile-age women treated with fertility-sparing surgery for borderline ovarian tumors in Sweden: a prospective nationwide population-based study," was published in Fertility and Sterility. BOTs make up about 10%–20% of all ovarian cancers, and about a third of them occur in women of childbearing age. These cancers tend to be diagnosed relatively early, and can often be treated surgically. Two surgeries can be used to treat BOTs. First is radical surgery, in which the ovaries and uterus are removed entirely. Second is fertility-sparing surgery, which aims to preserve the uterus and at least part of the ovaries. While radical surgery can effectively treat cancer, it has the obvious side effect of removing the patient's ability to become pregnant and bear children, since the reproductive organs required to do so are removed. As its name suggests, the goal of fertility-sparing surgery is to remove the cancer, while preserving the patient's reproductive ability. Previous studies have suggested that, even though fertility-sparing treatment may have higher cancer recurrence rates, both types of surgeries are comparable in terms of their effect on canc
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.