Lynparza Lowers Risk of Disease Progression in Advanced Ovarian Cancer, 5-year Data Show

Lynparza Lowers Risk of Disease Progression in Advanced Ovarian Cancer, 5-year Data Show
When used as a first-line therapy to treat newly diagnosed women with advanced ovarian cancer who previously responded to platinum-based chemotherapy, Lynparza (olaparib) prolonged the time they lived without showing signs of disease progression compared to a placebo, according to five-year data from a Phase 3 trial. Updated findings from the study, called SOLO-1 (NCT01844986), were presented at the recent 2020 European Society of Medical Oncology virtual congress. Lynparza is an anti-cancer therapy jointly developed by AstraZeneca and Merck (known as MSD outside the U.S. and Canada) that has been approved for the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer, and certain types of breast cancer. The medication works by blocking an enzyme called PARP, which plays an essential role in DNA repair, and cancer cell growth and survival. Lynparza is particularly effective in patients who carry genetic mutations in BRCA genes, which are also involved in DNA repair. It was approved as a first-line maintenance therapy for women with advanced ovarian cancer whose tumors contained BRCA mutations in the U.S., Europe, Japan, China, and other countries. The approvals were based on data from the Phase 3 SOLO-1 trial. SOLO-1 assessed the efficacy and safety of Lynparza in 391 women with either inherited or acquired BRCA mutations, who had high-grade serous or endometrioid ovarian cancer, primary peritoneal cancer, or fallopian tube cancer, and responded to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. During the study, patients were randomly assigned to receive either 300 mg of Lynparza or a placebo, twice daily, for up to two years, or until disease progression. The trial’s main goal was to determine if Lynparza could be superior to a placebo at prolonging
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