Second Surgery for Recurrent Ovarian Cancer Does Not Improve Survival, Phase 3 Trial Shows

Second Surgery for Recurrent Ovarian Cancer Does Not Improve Survival, Phase 3 Trial Shows
A second surgery followed by chemotherapy is no better than chemotherapy alone at extending the lives of women with platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer who experienced disease recurrence after a first surgery. Instead, it might shorten their lives, findings from a Phase 3 clinical trial show. Results from the first randomized trial testing the approach challenge the routine use of secondary surgery, which has been strongly considered for women with recurrent ovarian cancer. The study, “Secondary Surgical Cytoreduction for Recurrent Ovarian Cancer,” was published in The New England Journal of Medicine. In most cases, ovarian cancer treatment involves a combination of cytoreductive surgery, intended to remove the tumor and nearby tissues to which the cancer may have spread, and chemotherapy, which eliminates the small traces of cancer cells that remain after surgery and kill other cells that may have spread to distant regions of the body. Despite success in erasing all signs of cancer in large numbers of women, more than 80% of patients see their cancer return. Wh
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