A Second Surgery Can Improve Survival for Women with Recurring Ovarian Cancer, Study Shows

A Second Surgery Can Improve Survival for Women with Recurring Ovarian Cancer, Study Shows
Follow-up surgery to remove all traces of cancer can improve the survival of women whose ovarian cancer returned after initial surgery and chemotherapy, a Norwegian study shows. In the study, researchers found that a secondary surgery delayed the reappearance of new cancer for two years. The median overall survival rate for these patients was at least six years. The study, "Survival after secondary cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy compared with chemotherapy alone for first recurrence in patients with platinum‐sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer and no residuals after primary treatment. A registry‐based study," was published in the journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. Primary treatment of women with epithelial ovarian cancer typically consists of cytoreductive surgery to remove as many tumor cells as possible, followed by chemotherapy cycles. Although the disappearance of all signs of cancer, called complete remission, is obtained for a large number of patients, in some cases, cancer can return. This may happen even in patients whose first surgery completely removed all traces of a tumor.<
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