Pain Takes Significant Toll on Ovarian Cancer Survival, Study Shows

Pain Takes Significant Toll on Ovarian Cancer Survival, Study Shows
For the first time, scientists have found evidence that pain is an independent marker for overall survival in recurrent ovarian cancer, with women with pain living for significantly less time after their diagnosis than those without pain. The survival toll is particularly high for patients with pain despite receiving pain medication, who have seven months less to live than women without pain. The findings underscore the importance of effective pain management in ovarian cancer patients, the researchers said. "Pain has not only an immense impact on quality of life and functioning but also on overall survival in ovarian cancer," the investigators said. "Inadequate pain management was associated with decreased survival." The study, “The Prognostic and Predictive Role of Pain Before Systemic Chemotherapy in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer: an Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis of the North-Eastern German Society of Gynecological Oncology (NOGGO) of 1226 Patients,” was published in the journal Supportive Care in Cancer. Pain is a very common symptom among cancer patients and survivors, and it significantly affects quality of life and mental health. However, despite guidelines by multiple organizations for pain management, optimal pain medication remains a challenge. On top of that, physicians tend to underestimate pain in cancer patients, particularly in women, the study found. The researchers sought to determine if pain influences the survival of women with ovar
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