IMV, Wistar Institute Partner to Develop T-cell Immunotherapy Against Cancers with BRAF Mutations

IMV, Wistar Institute Partner to Develop T-cell Immunotherapy Against Cancers with BRAF Mutations
IMV announced that it has joined with the Wistar Institute to develop an immunotherapy targeting cancer cells with mutations in the BRAF gene. Such mutations are linked to some types of ovarian and other cancers. Under the partnership, IMV will use its proprietary DPX drug delivery platform to design an immunotherapy using small molecules provided by the Winstar Institute. The molecules mimic the abnormal BRAF protein, and activate T-cells against cancer cells carrying mutated BRAF proteins. “We are pleased to initiate this collaboration with The Wistar Institute, a world leader in biomedical research and early-stage discovery science with highly relevant expertise to our shared goals in the development of novel treatments for cancer,” Frederic Ors, IMV’s CEO, said in a press release. The BRAF gene holds the instructions to produce a cell surface protein with the same name. The protein controls a number of important cell functions, including growth and division, differentiation, migration, and programmed cell death. Mutations in this gene, however, lead to the production of a faulty protein that promotes cancer by letting cells proliferate and migrate without control. They are most frequently found in melanomas, but have also been identified in ovarian cancer
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