Lynparza-Avastin Combo Cuts Risk of Disease Progression, Death in Advanced OC, Phase 3 Trial Shows

Lynparza-Avastin Combo Cuts Risk of Disease Progression, Death in Advanced OC, Phase 3 Trial Shows
When added to Avastin (bevacizumab), Lynparza (olaparib) reduces the risk of disease progression and death in women with advanced forms of ovarian cancer who are responding to their first-line treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy, a Phase 3 trial shows. Lynparza is an oral anti-cancer treatment jointly developed by AstraZeneca and Merck (known as MSD outside the United States and Canada) for the treatment of advanced forms of ovarian, pancreatic, and certain types of breast cancer. It works by inhibiting the activity of an enzyme called PARP, which is involved in DNA repair and cancer cells' survival and proliferation. The medication has been found to be particularly effective in patients carrying genetic mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2, two tumor-suppressor genes that play a role in DNA repair. The randomized, double-blind, PAOLA-1 Phase 3 trial (NCT02477644) is currently assessing the effectiveness of Lynparza in combination with Avastin as a first-line maintenance therapy for women with advanced forms of ovarian cancer, with or without BRCA mutations, who had previously responded to treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy. Women in the trial were randomly assigned to receive either Lynparza tablets (300 mg twice a day) in combination with Avastin, or Avastin alone. The trial's primary endpoint was to assess the percentage of women alive and whose disease did not worsen after 15 months of treatment. Secondary endpoints included assessments of overall survival, time to disease progression, treatment safety, and tolerability. New data from PAOLA-1 recently announced by AstraZeneca and Merck have shown the trial met its primary endpoint, with a significantly higher proportion of women treated with the Lynparza-Avastin combo therapy showing n
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