ctDNA Sampling May Help Tailor Treatment for Difficult-to-Treat Ovarian Cancer, Study Suggests

ctDNA Sampling May Help Tailor Treatment for Difficult-to-Treat Ovarian Cancer, Study Suggests
An analysis of circulating tumor DNA, or ctDNA, can help guide treatment decisions for patients with difficult-to-treat high-grade serous ovarian cancer, a study shows. The study, “Prospective Longitudinal ctDNA Workflow Reveals Clinically Actionable Alterations in Ovarian Cancer,” was published in journal Precision Oncology. Cancers generally develop due to accumulation of genetic mutations in a specific cell. As cancer grows and spreads, tumor cells leak some of their DNA molecules into the bloodstream, so sampling these circulating tumor DNA may help provide a snapshot of the types of genetic mutations occur in cancer. Additionally, since the effectiveness of some chemotherapy regimens is dependent on the mutational status of the tumor, researchers have suggested that ctDNA analysis may provide useful information for personalized guided treatment. ctDNA sampling is an attractive assessment technique because it is minimally invasive, requiring only a common blood sample. Unfortunately, the clinical value of ctDNA remains controversial, particularly due to lack of standardized and often poorly described analysis approaches. To overcome this challenge, Finnish researchers implemented a clinical ctDNA workflow that can help detect clinically relevant mutations in more than 500 cancer-related genes. This workflow results from the combination of ctDNA analysis-tailored bioinformatics pipelines and a Translational Oncology Knowledgebase. Researchers applied their new workflow to a prospective cohort consisting of 78 ctD
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