Dutch Researchers Develop Mini Ovarian Cancers to Improve Personalized Therapies

Dutch Researchers Develop Mini Ovarian Cancers to Improve Personalized Therapies
Dutch researchers have developed a new experimental protocol that allowed them to culture mini ovarian cancers (organoids) in the lab that retained their three-dimensional structure and captured the cellular diversity seen in patients. These organoids, which mimic the cellular environment and treatment responses in patients, may be used to further explore the underlying mechanisms of ovarian cancer and open new avenues for therapeutic developments. The study, “An organoid platform for ovarian cancer captures intra- and interpatient heterogeneity,” was published in Nature Medicine. Compiling preclinical data has provided crucial information on how cancer cells, and tumors as a whole, behave and work to promote cancer progression. However, for many types of cancer, current preclinical models fail to capture the heterogeneity, or diversity, seen in a single tumor from one patient and between different patients. As an alternative to cell lines and patient-derived mouse models, researchers have been working on tumor organoid cultures that allow them to create three-dimensional cancer cultures that retain the molecular characteristics of the tumor from which they are derived. These tiny organoids don't look like a normal cancer, but the simple cell structures share many of the characteristics of real cancers, including their microenvironment, so researchers can use them to more accurately study cancer. Thus, researchers at the University of Utrecht in
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