Ultrasensitive Chip Detects Cancer Faster, Less Invasively than Current Approaches, Study Suggests

Ultrasensitive Chip Detects Cancer Faster, Less Invasively than Current Approaches, Study Suggests
Researchers have developed an ultrasensitive diagnostic device, a kind of "lab-on-a-chip," that quickly detects cancer using a droplet of blood, potentially allowing for an easier, cheaper, and more timely cancer diagnosis. The device is described in the study, "Ultrasensitive detection of circulating exosomes with a 3D-nanopatterned microfluidic chip," which was published in Nature Biomedical Engineering. The idea behind the chip is to detect cancer-related exosomes in the blood. Exosomes are little packages of cellular content — like proteins and DNA — that cells secrete to send messages to each other. "Basically, tumors send out exosomes packaging active molecules that mirror the biological features of the parental cells. While all cells produce exosomes, tumor cells are really active compared to normal cells," Yong Zeng, a professor at the University of Kansas and one of the study authors, said in a press release. Because tumor cells release exosomes into the blood, testing for them could, at least in theory, be done as part of routine bloodwork, which might allow tumors to be diagnosed more quickly. This is especially important for cancers such as ovarian cancer, which doesn't typically cause symptoms until the tumor has already started to advance and spread. The idea of detecting cancer exosomes in the blood isn't new, but it's been difficult to find a way to confidently impleme
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *