Mirvetuximab Soravtansine Fails to Delay Disease Progression in FRα-positive Ovarian Cancers, Trial Shows

Mirvetuximab Soravtansine Fails to Delay Disease Progression in FRα-positive Ovarian Cancers, Trial Shows
Mirvetuximab soravtansine, an investigational antibody-drug conjugate targeting the folate receptor alpha (FRα) protein, was no better than chemotherapy at delaying disease progression or death in ovarian cancer patients included in the FORWARD I Phase 3 trial. The treatment failed to extend survival without disease worsening in the overall study population — all patients had medium to high FRα levels in their tumors and were resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy — and in a subgroup of patients with high FRα levels, failing to met the trial's primary goal. Nonetheless, mirvetuximab soravtansine had a favorable safety profile and increased response and survival rates among patients with high FRα levels, which is encouraging its developer, ImmunoGen, to continue studying the treatment in combination approaches. “Even though FORWARD I did not meet its primary endpoint, I continue to be impressed with the efficacy and tolerability of mirvetuximab soravtansine in ovarian cancer patients, especially in the subset with high FRα expression,” Kathleen Moore, associate director of clinical research at the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma, said in a press release. “I look forward to continuing to work with ImmunoGen to analyze the Phase 3 data and determine the most appropriate path to bringing mirvetuximab soravtansine to those patients who benefit most from it.” Mirvetuximab soravtansine is an antibody-drug conjugate targeting the folate receptor alpha (FRα). This means the drug combin
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One comment

  1. Gary Carter says:

    I wonder if mirvetuximab soravtansine would be more effective as first line treatment with patients having high FRα levels.
    The toxicity comparison of chemo versus mirvetuximab soravtansine plus having increase response and survival rates should the FDA consider a limited approval based on these results?

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