Siamab’s ST1 Therapy Candidate Promising Against Chemoresistant Ovarian Cancer, Study Shows

Siamab’s ST1 Therapy Candidate Promising Against Chemoresistant Ovarian Cancer, Study Shows
Siamab Therapeutics' investigational antibody-drug conjugate ST1 has promising anti-tumor effects against chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer in cell and animal models, a study shows.  The study, “Treatment of ovarian cancer by targeting the tumor stem cell-associated carbohydrate antigen, Sialyl-Thomsen-nouveau,” was published in the journal Oncotarget. Tumor chemoresistance and recurrence is a serious health-threatening issue, affecting most women with ovarian cancer. New treatment strategies are urgently needed to target chemoresistant disease that does not respond to current therapies. Recurrent ovarian cancer is thought to occur because the body fails to eliminate rare cancer stem cells that are able to survive chemotherapy and lead to tumor relapse. Cancer stem cells are not unique to ovarian cancer and have been found in many other tumors. Given their key role in cancer progression, they have been pinpointed as important therapeutic targets. Researchers have been investigating molecules expressed only in cancer stem cells, which can serve as markers to target this cell population. A series of studies have shown there are certain sugar molecules abnormally expressed in cancer, which are collectively called tumor-associated carbohydrates. One of these sugar molecules is Sialyl-Thomsen-nouveau (STn), which appears on the surface of cancer cells and has been associated with chemotherapy resistance, metastatic disease, poor prognosis, and reduced overall survival. This molecule is found on the surface of several solid tumors, including prostate, pancreatic, gastric, and colon cancers. Researchers believe that STn is also involved in chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer and hypothesized that this sugar is a good marker of ovarian
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.