FATE-NK100 Shows Signs of Tumor Reduction in First Ovarian Cancer Patients in Phase 1 Trial

FATE-NK100 Shows Signs of Tumor Reduction in First Ovarian Cancer Patients in Phase 1 Trial
FATE-NK100, a natural killer cell immunotherapy, induced stable disease in one of the first two heavily treated ovarian cancer patients in a Phase 1 trial. No dose-limiting toxicities have been reported so far, Fate Therapeutics announced. The findings were recently revealed during the oral presentation, "Novel strategies to activate Adaptive NK cells and Make them antigen specific," at the Innate Killer Summit 2018 in San Diego, CA. FATE-NK100 is designed to boost patients' immune response against cancer cells. It is composed of donor-derived natural killer (NK) cells — an immune cell subset — activated in the lab for better anti-tumor activity. NK100 has shown promise in fighting both solid and liquid cancers. Compared to other NK cell therapies, the treatment is better at overcoming immune evasion strategies, such as activation of immune checkpoint pathways. The APOLLO trial (NCT03213964), currently recruiting participants at the University of Minnesota, is designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ascending NK100 doses in 16 ovarian cancer patients who failed to respond or progressed following platinum-based chemotherapy. The trial's primary goal is to determine the maximum tolerated dose, and secondary outcomes include the proportion of patients who respond to the therapy, the time a patient lives without disease progression, and overall survival. Preliminary data from the first two patients has shown a good safety profile, with no treatment-rela
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