Phase 1 Trial Finds TPIV200 Is Safe, Delays Recurrence in Ovarian, Breast Cancer

Phase 1 Trial Finds TPIV200 Is Safe, Delays Recurrence in Ovarian, Breast Cancer
An investigational vaccine called TPIV200 was found to be safe and generated strong T-cell immunity against tumor cells, significantly delaying recurrence in breast and ovarian cancer patients who had achieved complete responses in a Phase 1 trial. The study, "Folate Receptor Alpha Peptide Vaccine generates immunity in Breast and Ovarian Cancer Patients," appeared in the journal Clinical Cancer Research. While significant advances have been made in the treatment of breast and ovarian cancer, a significant number of patients still experience distant relapse. One way of extending cancer responses to treatment and improving survival is to increase anti-tumor immunity following standard treatment. This could be achieved through vaccination, creating tumor-specific T-cells that are actively scanning the body for new tumor cells. The folate receptor alpha (FRa) protein is highly elevated in tumors of the breast and ovaries, but has little production in healthy tissues, and so is a promising target for cancer vaccines. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic and TapImmune conducted a Phase 1 clinical trial (NCT01606241) to evaluate the safety and tolerability of TPIV200 — TapImmune's anti-FRa vaccine — in 14 patients with ovarian cancer and eight breast cancer patients. TPIV200 was administered as an adjuvant therapy to patients
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