New Imaging Method May Identify Ovarian Cancer Patients Likely to Benefit From PARP Inhibitors

New Imaging Method May Identify Ovarian Cancer Patients Likely to Benefit From PARP Inhibitors
A new imaging method aims to identify ovarian cancer patients most likely to benefit from treatment with PARP-1 inhibitors — a drug class being developed for people with mutations in the BRCA1 gene. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine presented their study, “Exploring the significance of PARP-1 expression for therapy and clinical PET/CT imaging of PARP-1 in ovarian cancer,” at the 2017 American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, held April 1-5 in Washington, D.C. PARP-1 is an enzyme that repairs broken DNA strands. BRCA is also involved in DNA repair, and mutations in these genes are common in ovarian cancer. But in ovarian cancers with mutated BRCA genes, the tumor often relies on PARP-1 for survival. So, in theory, blocking PARP-1 would make a tumor more prone to die from damage caused by DNA-destroying drugs. Since UPenn researchers didn't know whether the enzyme is active in any particular tumor, they developed a new type of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to solve the issue. PET uses a radioactive tracer to image structures within the body, and a new tracer allowed them to see the active enzyme. “Research exists that shows PARP inhibitors can be effective in the treatment of BRCA1 mutated cancer, but there are no good existing methods to explore how mutations within BRCA genes affect PARP-1 expression,” Mehran Makvandi, PharmD, RPh, the study’s lead author, said in a
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