Researchers Link Ovarian Cancer Risk to Socioeconomic Status in African-American Women

Researchers Link Ovarian Cancer Risk to Socioeconomic Status in African-American Women
Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), have found that the risk of ovarian cancer may be lower in African-American women with a higher socioeconomic status. The study, “Socioeconomic Status in Relation to the Risk of Ovarian Cancer in African-American Women: A Population-Based Case-Control Study,” is published in the American Journal of Epidemiology and highlights the need for additional evidence to thoroughly characterize the association between socioeconomic status and ovarian cancer. A team of researchers led by Anthony J. Alberg, PhD, MPH, interim director of the MUSC Hollings Cancer Center and a professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences conducted a population-based case-control study including 513 patients with incident ovarian cancer and 721 age- and area-matched control participants from 10 states. Patients were recruited into the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study from December 2010 through December 2014. Questionnaires were administered via telephone, and study participants responded to questions about several characteristics, including years of education, family annual income, and risk factors for ovarian cancer. The results revealed that ovarian cancer risk was 29 percent lower among women with a college degree or more, compared with those who had a
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *