Scientists Explain Why Ovarian Cancer Stops Responding to Some Chemotherapy Treatments

Scientists Explain Why Ovarian Cancer Stops Responding to Some Chemotherapy Treatments
Increased expression of the ABCB1 protein, which is known to induce resistance to Adriamycin (doxorubicin) and Abraxane (paclitaxel) in ovarian cancer patients, may also cause resistance to other ovarian cancer treatments. The study, "ABCB1 (MDR1) induction defines a common resistance mechanism in paclitaxel- and olaparib-resistant ovarian cancer cells," published in the British Journal of Cancer, suggests that some second-line chemotherapies should be avoided in patients who have already developed resistance to first-line therapies with taxanes. “Drug resistance is a major complication for many ovarian cancer patients," Dr. Gillian Smith, who led the research at the University of Dundee in Scotland, said in a press release. "Our study shows an important resistance mechanism which is common to drugs used routinely in the clinic and to new drugs which are being tested in clinical trials.” Standard of care for patients with ovarian cancer often includes a first-line combination of Paraplatin (carboplatin) and Abraxane, but some cancers develop a resistance and stop responding to those therapies. One possible mechanism that allows the cells to acquire resistance is the upregulation of ABCB1, which pumps the drugs out of the cancer cells. In women with BRCA mutations, a new family of drugs called PARP inhibitors has been showing promising results in clinical trials in p
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