DPX-Survivac Responses Now Up to 16 Months in Advanced Ovarian Cancer Trial

DPX-Survivac Responses Now Up to 16 Months in Advanced Ovarian Cancer Trial
IMV's immunotherapy DPX-Survivac plus low-dose chemotherapy continues to show sustained benefits in people with heavily treated advanced ovarian cancer, with some benefits lasting up to 16 months, updated findings from a Phase 1/2 clinical trial show. These data "clearly support the relevance of DPX-Survivac as a potential new and much-needed treatment option for advanced recurrent ovarian cancer, a hard-to-treat indication where other immunotherapies have thus far had limited success and where there is a high unmet medical need,” Fred Ors, president and CEO of IMV, said in a press release. DPX-Survivac is a new type of T-cell immunotherapy that works by stimulating the immune system to target and destroy cancer cells. Specifically, it targets cancer cells that carry survivin on their surface, a protein known to promote tumor growth. The immunotherapy, composed of small fractions of the survivin protein, is delivered as an under-the-skin injection to trigger a durable activation of T-cells (immune cells with the ability to fight cancers) against survivin-positive cancers. The DECIDE1 trial (NCT02785250) is evaluating a combination of DPX-Survivac plus low-dose intermittent cyclophosphamide to treat women whose ovarian cancer came back after surgery and treatment with at least one chemotherapy regimen. Its main goals are to investigate the treatment's safety, the proportion of patients who respond to treatment, and the percentage of those attaining at least stable disease. Secondary measures include duration of responses, the time patients live without signs of disease progression, and overall survival. Researchers will also investigate if the immunotherapy generates survivin-specific T-cells, and whether these cells are effectively entering tumo
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