Small Inhibitor May Boost Effectiveness of PARP Inhibitors in Some Ovarian Cancers, Mouse Study Finds

Small Inhibitor May Boost Effectiveness of PARP Inhibitors in Some Ovarian Cancers, Mouse Study Finds
A small inhibitor that prevents cells from making ribosomes — the machinery used to produce proteins — may improve the effectiveness of PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancers with mutations in DNA repair genes, a study in mice found. This inhibitor is a promising approach for ovarian cancers that are no longer susceptible to platinum-based chemotherapy or PARP inhibitors. The study with this finding, "CX-5461 activates the DNA damage response anddemonstrates therapeutic efficacy in high-gradeserous ovarian cancer," was published in Nature Communications. PARP inhibitors such as Lynparza (olaparib) or Zejula (niraparib), are ovarian cancer treatments that block enzymes needed for adequately correcting DNA errors in cells, preventing cancer cells from repairing their DNA, and ultimately causing their death. Despite their increasing use in ovarian cancer patients, there are cases of resistance to these treatments, and researchers have been working to find strategies to overcome such resistance. CX-546 is a small molecule inhibitor that targets
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.