Zejula-Keytruda Trial Results Warrant Further Investigation for Recurrent OC

Zejula-Keytruda Trial Results Warrant Further Investigation for Recurrent OC
A combination of Zejula (niraparib) and Keytruda (pembrolizumab) is well-tolerated and has promising anti-tumor activity in women with ovarian carcinoma who have failed prior platinum-based chemotherapy, results from a Phase 1/2 trial show. Overall, 18% of the patients responded to the combo regimen, regardless of platinum resistance, BRCA mutations, or prior treatment with bevacizumab (brand names Avastin, Mvasi, and Zirabev), warranting further investigation in a larger trial, the researchers said. Response rates seemed particularly significant for patients without BRCA or other DNA repair mutations. The data were described in the report, "Single-Arm Phases 1 and 2 Trial of Niraparib in Combination With Pembrolizumab in Patients With Recurrent Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Carcinoma," published in the journal JAMA Oncology. Zejula is approved as a maintenance therapy for recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer in patients who have had a complete or partial response to platinum-based therapy. The medicine is taken as a once-daily pill and can be used in women with or without germline, or inherited, mutations in BRCA genes. It is a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, which means it works by blocking the activity of PARP proteins — enzymes involved in the repair of damaged DNA inside cells. Zejula is marketed by Tesaro, a GSK company. Keytruda is an anti-PD-1 antibody given as into-the-vein injections. It is approved for several solid and some blood cancers. It belongs to the class of immune checkpoint inhibitors, and works by boosting the immune response against tumor cells. Keytruda is sold by Merck (known as MSD outside the United States and Canada). Preclinical studies have suggested that these two
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