Removing Lymph Nodes Does Not Improve Survival Outcomes of Advanced Ovarian Cancer Patients, Trial Shows

Removing Lymph Nodes Does Not Improve Survival Outcomes of Advanced Ovarian Cancer Patients, Trial Shows
Women with advanced ovarian cancer who underwent a complete resection of their tumor and have normal lymph nodes do not have better survival outcomes if the lymph nodes surrounding the tumor are removed, and instead, have a higher incidence of complications after surgery, a randomized trial shows. The study, "A Randomized Trial of Lymphadenectomy in Patients with Advanced Ovarian Neoplasms," was published in The New England Journal of Medicine One of the most important prognostic factors for ovarian cancer patients is the amount of tumor that remains after surgery, with patients who have no macroscopically visible tumor having better outcomes than those with visible tumor after surgery. But patients often experience cancer spreading to their lymph nodes, and retrospective analyses suggest that removing the pelvic and paraaortic lymph nodes — those surrounding the aorta near the kidney area — may improve the survival outcomes of advanced ovarian cancer patients. Aiming to confirm the findings, researchers at the Philipps University Marburg Medical Center, in collaboration with the German Research Foundation, conducted a prospective clinical trial in which 647 patients were randomly assigned lymph node removal — a procedure called lymphadenectomy — or no lymphadenectomy. The LION trial (
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