Bavencio Shows Promise in Heavily Treated Ovarian Cancer Patients in Phase 1b Trial

Bavencio Shows Promise in Heavily Treated Ovarian Cancer Patients in Phase 1b Trial
Immune checkpoint inhibitor Bavencio (avelumab) has an acceptable safety profile and shows some anti-tumor activity among heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients, according to a Phase 1b trial. Findings from the trial were reported in the study, “Efficacy and Safety of Avelumab for Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian Cancer,” published in the journal JAMA Oncology. While platinum-based chemotherapy, alone or in combination with other treatments, is the current standard of care for advanced ovarian cancer patients, about 70 percent will see their disease return or progress within three years. Patients who fail platinum chemotherapy have poor outcomes, with current approaches providing limited benefits. As a result, additional treatments are needed to prolong survival in these patients. The interaction between PD-L1 and its receptor PD-1, found in immune cells, is used to prevent overactive immune responses that might damage the organism. However, tumor cells hijack this mechanism to prevent immune attacks. Molecules that prevent this binding are called immune checkpoint inhibitors. Increasing evidence indicates that these therapies could be beneficial to ovarian cancer patients. In fact, the presence of immune cells inside tumors seems to predict better outcomes, and most tumors produce the PD-L1 factor. Several immune checkpoint inhibitors are already approved as cancer treatments. Bavencio, however, seems to induce a broader immune activation than other molecules of the same kind. The therapy
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