Ovarian Cancer Cells Retain Iron to Fuel Growth, Research Suggests

Ovarian Cancer Cells Retain Iron to Fuel Growth, Research Suggests
Iron accumulation, a well-known feature of ovarian cancer cells, may play a role in cancer progression by increasing fatty acid metabolism, researchers at UConn Health suggest. Their study, “A Systems Biology Approach to Understanding the Pathophysiology of High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer: Focus on Iron and Fatty Acid Metabolism,” was published in OMICS: A Journal Of Integrative Biology. High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the most common and aggressive type of ovarian cancer, with only 35 percent of patients living past the five-year mark. Like many cancer types, ovarian cancer cells are known to retain iron more extensively than normal cells. Iron is needed for DNA replication and participates in multiple cancer signaling pathways. But the exact role of iron in ovarian cancer remains unclear. Researchers believe that understanding the molecular basis of cancer progression and the role iron plays in the disease may open up better therapeutic opportunities. UConn Health researchers examined four publicly available gene expression datasets, comparing different cell types. The idea was to find common expression patterns that could shed light on iron's role in ovarian cancer's development and progression. Of the four datasets, two used cells from HGSOC and their environment. The third used fallopian and HGSOC cells, but because of the similarity in their gene expression profiles, researchers combined the information as HGSOC
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