Gene Mutations Increasing Ovarian Cancer Risk May Be Passed Down from Fathers, Study Suggests

Gene Mutations Increasing Ovarian Cancer Risk May Be Passed Down from Fathers, Study Suggests
Mutations in a newly identified gene that may increase women's risk of ovarian cancer could be passed down through the X chromosome, a new study shows. The findings suggest that ovarian cancer mutations may be inherited from the father, which could explain why sisters of ovarian cancer patients are more likely to develop the disease than their mothers. The research, “Paternal lineage early onset hereditary ovarian cancers: A Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry study,” appeared in the journal PLOS Genetics. One of the strongest predictors of ovarian cancer risk is a history of ovarian cancer among close relatives. This is a reason women are recommended for genetic testing. Researchers previously had not understood why affected women's sisters are at a higher risk than their mothers. But scientists at the Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center in Buffalo, New York, believed this could be explained if a gene located in the father's X chromosome could contribute to the daughters' risk of ovarian cancer. Women receive two X chromosomes — one from the mother and one from the father. To test their hypothesis, researchers used Roswell Park's Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry and collected information on pairs of granddaughters and grandmothers. They conducted a genomic analysis of the X chromosomes of 186 women with ovarian cancer from the registry. The results showed that ovarian cancer linked to genes inherited from the paternal grandmother manifested at an earlier age compared to women inheriting these gene
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