Ovarian Cancer Screening Too Limited to Aid Women with No Genetic Risk, US Group Says in Policy Update

Ovarian Cancer Screening Too Limited to Aid Women with No Genetic Risk, US Group Says in Policy Update
Women who show no symptoms and have no known hereditary risk for ovarian cancer should skip screening for this cancer, a U.S. task force now recommends.  The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) made the recommendation in “Screening for Ovarian Cancer,” a "statement" published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).  It updated the group's previous recommendation for this cancer, released in 2012. In it, USPSTF notes that the harm from screening for ovarian cancer, which can include unnecessary surgery, outweighs the benefits, and recommends against screening for ovarian cancer in asymptomatic women who are not at high risk of hereditary cancer. In the U.S., ovarian cancer is diagnosed in 11 out of 100,000 women per year. Despite its low incidence, the disease is  the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancer. Approximately 14,000 women die of ovarian cancer there each year. Frequently, no symptoms are present in the early stages of the disease, and when they do appear, they are usually nonspecific, including abdominal pain or pressure, bloating, constipation, urinary symptoms, back pain, or fatigue. As a result, most women (88 percent) are not diagnosed until la
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Ana is a molecular biologist enthusiastic about innovation and communication. In her role as a science writer she wishes to bring the advances in medical science and technology closer to the public, particularly to those most in need of them. Ana holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she focused her research on molecular biology, epigenetics and infectious diseases.

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