Targeting Cancer Stem Cells May Lower Relapse Rates, Early Research Suggests

Targeting Cancer Stem Cells May Lower Relapse Rates, Early Research Suggests
Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, which prevent epigenetic modifications in the DNA, may be able to eliminate cancer stem cells (CSCs) in ovarian and breast cancers, making relapses less likely after standard-of-care treatments, researchers report. The study, "Identification of a cancer stem cell-specific function for the histone deacetylases, HDAC1 and HDAC7, in breast and ovarian cancer," published in Oncogene, makes use of a new, genetically engineered cell line that mimics the behavior of CSCs, potentially helping researchers to better understand the biology of these cells. "The best way to understand something is to build it," Tan Ince, MD, PhD, scientific director of Sylvester's Live Tumor Culture Core and Tissue Bank Core Facility, an associate professor of pathology at the University of Miami's medical school, and the study's lead author, said in a press release. "We have created a cell line that mimics cancer stem cells, and by studying them we have identified two leukemia-targeting drugs that could be used to treat breast and ovarian cancers." A vast number of researchers now believe that among cancerous cells, a few act as stem cells that reproduce themselves and sustain the cancer, acting much like normal stem cells do in healthy tissues to renew and sustain the body. The idea of a cancer being primarily driven by a smaller population of stem cells has important implications, particularly because most anti
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *