GPS Vaccine-Keytruda Combo Showing Efficacy in Advanced Cancer Patients

GPS Vaccine-Keytruda Combo Showing Efficacy in Advanced Cancer Patients
Combining the experimental vaccine galinpepimut-S (GPS) with the immune checkpoint inhibitor Keytruda (pembrolizumab) induces promising responses in people with metastatic ovarian cancer who failed one or two prior lines of treatment, early data from a Phase 1/2 trial show. The combination kept all eight patients in a first evaluated group in the trial (NCT03761914) without signs of disease progression for at least six weeks, and had a similar safety profile to that of Keytruda alone. The trial is recruiting ovarian cancer patients at multiple sites across the U.S. Eligible participants are those with ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer who failed prior platinum-based chemotherapy, and were offered bevacizumab treatment. If a patient carries BRCA mutations, treatment with a PARP inhibitor must also have been offered. “These safety findings are accompanied by promising early indications of an efficacy signal for patients with advanced metastatic disease, whose management is extremely challenging even with checkpoint inhibitor monotherapy,” Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD, chair of the scientific advisory board for Sellas Life Science, the vaccine's developer, said in a press release. GPS is an investigational vaccine that targets the WT-1 protein, one of the most common cancer-associated proteins. It contains four small proteins aiming to elicit a strong innate immune response against WT-1, increasing the immune system's ability to destroy cancer cells. Like a conventional vaccine, GPS is also meant to trigger an “immunological memory,” empowering the immune system with the ability to stop tumors from coming back. “GPS has previously been shown to invoke multi-epitope, broad cross-reactivity along the full-length of the WT1 protei
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