Second Surgery May Aid Survival in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Study Finds

Second Surgery May Aid Survival in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Study Finds
Woman whose ovarian cancer returns more than six months after initial surgery and chemotherapy may benefit from a second surgery, but only if the entire tumor is removed during the procedure, data from a clinical trial show. Patients should be carefully selected for a second surgery, based on the likelihood that this surgery will successfully remove the entire cancer, its researchers said. These data were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2020 annual meeting, which was held virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The presentation, "Randomized phase III study to evaluate the impact of secondary cytoreductive surgery in recurrent ovarian cancer: Final analysis of AGO DESKTOP III/ENGOT-ov20," was given by Helen MacKay, MD, of the University of Toronto. Recurrent ovarian cancer refers to cancer that was initially treated successfully (e.g., removed through surgery), but that then returned (recurred). How best to treat recurrent ovarian cancer — whether by surgery, medication, chemotherapy, or combinations of treatments — remains an ongoing area of research. "The topic of secondary surgery is not a new one," MacKay said in a news story, adding that secondary surgery for recurrent ovarian cancer is recommended in
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