Acelarin Trial Shows Potential in Chemo-resistant Ovarian Cancer, But Study Ending

Acelarin Trial Shows Potential in Chemo-resistant Ovarian Cancer, But Study Ending
Treatment with Acelarin led to one complete response and two partial responses in heavily pre-treated women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, early results from a Phase 2 trial show. Full analysis of the study's first part is ongoing. However, the treatment's developer, NuCana, has decided not to continue with a planned second part to focus on trials in other cancers. Acelarin (NUC-1031) is designed to help patients overcome resistance to common chemotherapies, such as platinum-based chemotherapies. It is based on the structure of two chemotherapy agents, gemcitabine (sold as Gemzar by Eli Lilly, among other brands) and 5-fluorouracil. The idea is that a combination of the agents will be more effective than either treatment alone, and able to overcome treatment resistance. The PRO-105 trial (NCT03146663) tested Acelarin alone in ovarian cancer patients with a median of five prior lines of chemotherapy treatment. The study, conducted in the U.S. and U.K., was divided in two parts: in part one, women receive one of two Acelarin doses — 500 or 750 mg/m2 — on days one, eight, and 15. In total, 45 women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer were enrolled for part 1. The majority (72%) had at least one additional disease (comorbidity) at the trial's start. This may have contributed to almost half of the participants (45%) not being able to complete the first round of Acelarin treatment, despite a lack of disease progression or serious adverse effects. In total, 23 women completed two or more cycles of Acelarin in part 1. Preliminary results show that 19 women (83%) experienced disease control, with three (13%) responding to treatment. Specifically, a review by an independent panel reported that one woman achieved a complete response, me
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