GEN-1 Added to Chemo Improves Removal of Ovarian Tumors, Early Data Show

GEN-1 Added to Chemo Improves Removal of Ovarian Tumors, Early Data Show
The immunotherapy candidate GEN-1 has shown encouraging results in patients newly diagnosed with advanced ovarian cancer, according to initial results of the OVATION 2 study. Adding GEN-1 to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (given before surgery to shrink tumors) increased the proportion of patients with complete removal of their tumors through surgery. GEN-1, developed by Celsion Corporation, consists of a DNA vector coding for the pro-inflammatory protein interleukin (IL)-12. Its delivery system is made of nanoparticles designed to carry the DNA vector to cells at the tumor site. This would allow sustained production of IL-12 in the vicinity of the tumor, which is expected to improve the infiltration of immune cells and boost immune attacks against cancer. IL-12 is one of the most active chemical messengers (cytokines) inducing anti-cancer immunity. However, its administration requires frequent injections and may lead to serious toxicity. GEN-1 was designed to circumvent these issues. Because it can be injected directly into the tumor site, it provides local increases in IL-12, with minimal effects on the rest of the body. The safety and anti-tumor activity of GEN-1 has been demonstrated in animal models and in Phase 1 trials with advanced ovarian cancer patients. This includes the
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