Cellular Recycling Genes Linked to Ovarian Tumor Formation in Mice, Study Shows

Cellular Recycling Genes Linked to Ovarian Tumor Formation in Mice, Study Shows
Disrupting genes essential for the cellular recycling process known as autophagy increases the frequency of mutations during cell division and promotes the formation of ovarian cancer tumors, a study in mice has found. These findings support further investigation into the process of autophagy, which is often abnormal in ovarian cancer patients, as a potential target for future treatments. The study, “Autophagy genes act as tumor suppressors in ovarian cancer,” was published in PLOS Genetics. Autophagy is the tightly-regulated mechanism that removes unnecessary or abnormal components from the cell, allowing the degradation and recycling of cellular components. Autophagy genes have been found to play a role in cancer resistance to stresses such as chemotherapy while, paradoxically, they have also been implicated in the prevention of tumor formation.
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