Lynparza-Avastin First-Line Maintenance Therapy Delays Cancer Progression in Advanced OC, Phase 3 Study Shows

Lynparza-Avastin First-Line Maintenance Therapy Delays Cancer Progression in Advanced OC, Phase 3 Study Shows
Adding Lynparza (olaparib) to Avastin (bevacizumab) as a first-line maintenance treatment significantly delayed disease progression in women with advanced ovarian cancer — regardless of BRCA mutation status — interim data from a Phase 3 study show. This maintenance therapy was given after partial or complete response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. The benefits were, however, even more pronounced in women with mutations in the BRCA genes, and others involved in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair, these early results show. The results were presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress 2019 that recently took place in Barcelona, Spain. The oral presentation was titled, “Phase III PAOLA-1/ENGOT-ov25 trial: Olaparib plus bevacizumab (bev) as maintenance therapy in patients (pts) with newly diagnosed, advanced ovarian cancer (OC) treated with platinum-based chemotherapy (PCh) plus bev.” Lynparza, a PARP inhibitor developed by AstraZeneca and Merck (known as MSD outside the U.S. and Canada), acts by blocking the activity of the PARP enzyme — a DNA damage sensor. That leads to the accumulation of DNA damage and ultimately the death of cancer cells. This therapy is particularly effective in cancer cells with defects in other DNA repair pathways — such as those with mutations in HR genes, including the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Those cells rely on PARP to survive and proliferate. This year, Lynparza was approved in the U.S., the European Union, and Japan as a first-line maintenance therapy for women with BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer who responded to standard platinum-based chemotherapy. It also is approved for the treatment of some recurrent or relapsed advanced ovarian cancers, dependent o
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