Zejula Prolongs Life Without Disease Worsening in Newly Diagnosed Advanced Ovarian Cancer, Trial Shows

Zejula Prolongs Life Without Disease Worsening in Newly Diagnosed Advanced Ovarian Cancer, Trial Shows
Maintenance treatment with Zejula (niraparib) prolongs the time lived without disease worsening in women with newly diagnosed advanced ovarian cancer who are responding to their first-line platinum-based chemotherapy — regardless of mutations in DNA repair genes — a Phase 3 clinical trial has shown. Patients treated with Zejula lived a median of 5.6 months more compared with those receiving a placebo. The therapy led to an even greater benefit – a median lengthening of 11.5 months – in women who had tumors defective in DNA repair, a status termed "homologous recombination deficiency" (HRD). GSK, the owner of Zejula, plans to use this data to ask for an extension of the therapy's approved indication by the end of 2019. The trial results were presented Sept. 28 at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2019 congress, held in Barcelona, Spain, and simultaneously made available in a more detailed report "Niraparib in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Advanced Ovarian Cancer," published in the journal New England Journal of Medicine. Zejula is a once-daily, oral medicine indicated for maintenance treatment of women with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who have had a response (complete or partial) to platinum-based chemotherapy (usually cisplatin or carboplatin). The therapy belongs to a class of cancer therapies known as PARP inhibitors, and is marketed by Tesaro, a GSK company. The standard treatment for newly diagnosed advanced ovarian cancer consists of tumor reduction surgery plus platinum–taxane chemotherapy. This approach is still very ineffective, with up to 85% of the patients having the disease recur after treatment, and because the use of additional therapies is limited by safet
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