Sentinel Node Biopsy Feasible to Determine Spread of Early-stage OC

Sentinel Node Biopsy Feasible to Determine Spread of Early-stage OC
A sentinel node biopsy, used to determine whether cancer has spread to lymph nodes, is a feasible way to obtain information and avoid lymph node dissection in patients with early-stage ovarian cancer, a new study shows. The study, “Sentinel-Node Biopsy in Early Stage Ovarian Cancer: Preliminary Results of a Prospective Multicentre Study (SELLY),” was published in thea American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological tumor. The primary factor that determines life expectancy is the stage at which the patient presents and whether the cancer has metastasized to the lymph nodes. Unfortunately, only 20–25% of patients are diagnosed at an early stage. And even among these patients, an estimated 14–15% of patients have have lymph node metastasis. Pre-operative imaging is not very effective when it comes to detecting lymph node metastasis. Therefore, it is recommended for surgeons to do a systemic lymphadenectomy (dissection of all lymph nodes in the pelvic and para-aortic regions) as part of the surgical staging for the disease. This is important, as information about possible lymph node metastasis can help guide physicians when it comes to making decisions regarding additional treatment. However, the importance of obtaining this information must be balanced against the risks associated with the procedure, which include injuries to major blood vessels, excessive blood loss, and nerve lesions. Alternatively, surgeons can conduct a sentinel node biopsy, a surgical procedure that can help determine whether cancer has spread beyond a primary tumor and into the lymphatic system. The se
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *