BRCA1/2 Protection Factor Decreases over Time in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer, Study Reports

BRCA1/2 Protection Factor Decreases over Time in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer, Study Reports
Women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer have better survival rates at five years of diagnosis if they carry mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. However, this benefit decreases over 15 years of follow-up, according to a long-term study from Israel. The research, “Fifteen-year survival of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer in women with BRCA1/2 mutations – the National Israeli Study of Ovarian Cancer,” appeared in the journal Gynecologic Oncology. Although studies have shown that ovarian cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations respond better to platinum-based chemotherapy and have extended survival at up to five years of diagnosis compared to patients without such mutations, whether this translates into prolonged survival in the long term remains unclear. Aiming to address this gap, scientists analyzed the 5-, 10-, and 15-year survival rates of 779 Jewish women (median age at diagnosis 60 years) with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer with or without BRCA1/2 mutations. All patients were diagnosed between 1994 and 1999 and were followed up to November 2015 through the Israel National Population Registry. Also, all patients were treated by tumor-debulking surgery, followed by platinum-based chemotherapy. A total of 229 women were carriers of the Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutations in BRCA1 — known as 185delAG and 5382insC – and BRCA2 (6174delT), while 550 were non-carrier
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