Recent Formulations of Hormonal Birth Control Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk, Researchers Report

Recent Formulations of Hormonal Birth Control Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk, Researchers Report
Combined oral contraceptives — containing both smaller doses of estrogens plus newer progestogens — are associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer in women younger than 50, a large study suggests. The research, “Association between contemporary hormonal contraception and ovarian cancer in women of reproductive age in Denmark: prospective, nationwide cohort study,” was published in The BMJ. Oral, intravaginal, injectable, and patch estrogen-progestogen combinations are used to prevent pregnancy. The numerous hormone-containing contraceptives available differ in the estrogen compound used and its dose, the progestogen used, the schedule of exposure to the drugs, and the means of administration. “Previous research has shown a reduced risk of ovarian cancer in users of combined oral contraceptives, an effect that persists for many years after stopping use. However, most of the evidence relates to the use of older and higher-dose preparations of estrogen containing older progestogens,” investigators said. Therefore, there’s a need to understand if this is also true for newer formulations of combined hormonal contraceptives, which now include lower estrogen doses and newer progestogens, and if a potential ovarian cancer risk benefit is specific to a certain formulation. In a prospective, Danish cohort study, researchers sought to investigate the association between contemporary combined hormonal contraceptives (including progestogen types in combined preparations and all progestogen-only products) and o
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *