American Cancer Society Reports Covers Gains in Treatment and Prevention, and Challenges That Remain

American Cancer Society Reports Covers Gains in Treatment and Prevention, and Challenges That Remain
By year's end, about 22,240 new cases of ovarian cancer will be diagnosed in the United States, a newly released report from the American Cancer Society estimates. The report, titled “Ovarian Cancer Statistics, 2018” provides an overview of data on ovarian cancer recurrence and mortality rates. It was published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. "Although ovarian cancer is not one of the most common cancers, it causes 5 percent of cancer deaths among US women," Lindsey Torre, MSPH, the report's lead author, said in a press release. “Understanding of the disease has evolved rapidly in recent years; however, much remains to be gained in ovarian cancer research." The report notes that the overall incidence ovarian cancer declined by 29 percent from 1985 to 2014, while mortality declined 33 percent from 1976 to 2015. Multiple births, use of oral contraceptives and oophorectomy – surgical removal of one or both ovaries – could be contributing to a lesser overall risk of ovarian cancer, while menopausal hormones have been observed to increase risk. A family history of breast or ovarian cancer remains the strongest risk for the disease. Genetic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes account for almost 40 percent of known cases in women with a family history of the disease. For this reason, genetic testing is recommended for all women diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and may help them to make more informed decisions regarding their me
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