MAGENTA Study Seeks Women to Evaluate At-home Ovarian Cancer Genetic Test

MAGENTA Study Seeks Women to Evaluate At-home Ovarian Cancer Genetic Test
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is currently seeking women to enroll in the MAGENTA study to evaluate the first at-home test to assess the risk of ovarian cancer. The MAGENTA study aims to improve the availability of genetic tests for people at risk of hereditary cancers, through the use of an online genetic testing service. The goal is to make genetic testing accessible to everyone, leaving out the need to travel to a healthcare provider and saving more lives in the process. “There are a lot of barriers to genetic testing and MAGENTA is designed to make it much easier, so women don’t have to take time off from work, they don’t have to get child care, they can do it in their own home,” Kathleen Gavin, executive director of Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance, a partner in the MAGENTA study, told CBS Minnesota News. “We’re hoping to identify more people with the information so they can take steps to reduce their risk.” MD Anderson researchers are now seeking participants to undergo genetic testing for 19 genes associated with inherited cancer risk, including ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, BRIP1, CDH1, CHEK2, EPCAM, MSH2, MSH6, MLH1, NBN, PALB2, PMS2, PTEN, RAD51C, RAD51D, TP53, and STK11. To qualify for the study, participants must be 30 or older, have a valid mailing address in the U.S., have had breast cancer or a family member who had either breast or ovarian cancer, have at least one ovary, and have never had genetic testing or counseling for cancer risk in the past. After filling out personal and family health history information, those who are
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