Genetic Testing Helps Identify Ovarian Cancer Patients with BRCA Mutations, UK Study Finds

Genetic Testing Helps Identify Ovarian Cancer Patients with BRCA Mutations, UK Study Finds
Genetic testing as part of routine cancer care, an approach called mainstreamed genetic testing, or MGT, is a feasible way to test BRCA mutations in ovarian cancer patients, a new U.K. study reports. For those who tested positive, a relevant proportion of patients accessed targeted treatment they wouldn't otherwise be eligible to receive. The study, “Mainstreamed genetic testing for women with ovarian cancer: first-year experience,” appeared in the Journal of Medical Genetics. Ovarian cancer may be caused by gene mutations. Specifically, mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes cause 5.8% to 24.8% of all ovarian cancer cases. Until recently, genetic testing was only available to U.K. patients with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, or those of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. A review study showed that only five of 15 guidelines recommend testing regardless of family history, ancestry, or cancer histology. But up to 44% of BRCA mutation carriers do not have a significant family history. Finding out which ovarian cancer patients carry BRCA mutations is important to guide treatment decisions. A recent regulatory decision included women with high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer and without a family history of disease in the group eligible for testing through MGT. However, there is still a lack of consensus regarding how BRCA testing should be provided to ovarian cancer patients. Introduced in February 2015, the research team evaluated the results of the first year of MGT at
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.