Prexasertib Shrinks Ovarian Cancer Tumors in a Third of Phase 2 Trial Participants

Prexasertib Shrinks Ovarian Cancer Tumors in a Third of Phase 2 Trial Participants
The DNA repair inhibitor prexasertib shrank the tumors of a third of the ovarian cancer patients treated with it in a Phase 2 clinical trial, preliminary results show. Its developer, Eli Lilly, said the participants had recurring cancer that failed to respond to platinum-based chemotherapy. The specific form was high-grade serious ovarian carcinoma —or HGSOC — without BRCA gene mutations. The cancer of those whose tumors shrank did not progress for a median of 7 1/2 months after the start of treatment, researchers said. They said the therapy was particularly beneficial for women whose disease returned within six months of completing platinum-based chemo. The study, published in The Lancet Oncology, is titled Prexasertib, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 inhibitor, in BRCA wild-type recurrent high-grade serous ovarian cancer: a first-in-class proof-of-concept phase 2 study.” “I’m glad this new, promising drug may contribute to our patients’ benefit,” Dr. Jung-Min Lee, a trial investigator at the National Cancer Institute's Center for Cancer Research, said in a press release. He was the lead author of the study. Prexasertib inhibits the checkpoint 1 and 2 proteins, CHK1 and CHK2. They pause the cell cycle — or process by which a cell divides into two cells — to repair DNA mutations that occur during the
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