Ovarian Cancer Screening Every 4 Months Reduces Risk of Advanced Disease, Study Finds

Ovarian Cancer Screening Every 4 Months Reduces Risk of Advanced Disease, Study Finds
Women at high risk of developing ovarian cancer should be screened every four months, recent research suggests. The study, “Evidence of Stage Shift in Women Diagnosed with Ovarian Cancer during Phase II of the United Kingdom Familial Ovarian Cancer Screening Study,” appeared in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Ovarian cancer is usually detected in later stages when the prognosis is poor. Yet when detected early using regular biomarker tests, the prognosis is excellent. Genetic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and Lynch syndrome (LS) are associated with a high risk for ovarian cancer: BRAC2 carriers are 11 to 37 percent likely to develop the disease by age 70, and BRCA1 carriers are at  to 65 percent risk of developing the disease, according to the study. Doctors recommend that high-risk women have their ovaries and fallopian tubes removed after completing their families or going through natural menopause. Yet many women either delay surgery or decline it altogether. Now, University College London's UK Familial Ovarian Cancer Screening Study (UK FOCSS) concludes that screening high-risk women every four months with the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm (ROCA) may be an option until they choose surgery. ROCA, a test licensed to UCL spinoff Abcodia, looks for increasing levels of the CA 125 protein in the blood, which is usually high in women with ovarian cancer. The study included 4,348 women with a one
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